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HTC HD7 Windows Phone 7 still going strong and proving the OS has great features


The HTC HD7 Windows Phone 7 smartphone was one of the first mobile phones to receive the mobile handset version of the popular Windows 7 PC operating system. Unlike Android operating systems, and much like Apple iOS software, the Windows Phone 7 operating system mimics a system many PC users are already familiar with using on their laptops and desktop computers. Also, compatibility between a mobile handset and any software or applications that handset owner may be using on their PC is guaranteed because the operating systems are basically one and the same.

Aside from being one of the very few phones which don’t employ Android or iOS software, the HTC HD7 is familiar in many regards. Physically, HTC employs the same basic form factor as most mobile handsets today, with a rectangular, black slab appearance. One way it stands out in design is with its handy kickstand which props the phone up for hands-free viewing of movies, videos and other content.

The 4.3 inch capacitive touchscreen LCD display offers 480 x 800 pixel resolution, and supports multitouch gesture navigation. A light sensor and a proximity sensor are built into the screen, and a protective layer of anti-scratch Corning Gorilla Glass overlays the display. Talk time runs to 6.3 hours on a single charge, 5.3 hours when operating on 3G, and standby time is 13 days.

The HTC HD7 offers a rear facing camcorder for recording video and still shots, and records in 1280 x 720 pixel resolution, which translates to 720P HD. The rear facing camcorder also features a dual LED flash, autofocus and several preprogrammed scenes. The HTC HD7 has an FM radio built into the handset, and video and audio players as well. The audio player supports MP3, WMA, M4A (Apple lossless) and M4B, while the video player can handle MPEG4, WMV, 3GP and 3G2 file formats.

On the software side, a Facebook app is preloaded, HTML web browsing is supported and the HTC HD7 is equipped to handle Adobe Flash media player videos and web pages. As we mentioned above, Windows phone 7 is the operating system on board the HTC HD7, and the processor is a 1.0 GHz chip with 576 MB of RAM and 512 MB of ROM memory supporting it.

Source: http://www.mobilebloom.com/htc-hd7-windows-phone-7-still-going-strong-and-proving-the-os-has-great-features/225293/

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2011 in Android, Apple, iOS, Windows Phone 7

 

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Windows Phone 7, Day 30: WP7 ‘Mango’ Is Ready for Prime Time


30 Days With Windows Phone 7: Day 30

Another 30 Days journey comes to an end. For me, the 30 Days With Windows Phone 7 has been the most enjoyable and enlightening of them all so far.

The first time I experimented with Windows Phone 7 there were some things I liked about it, but overall I found it disappointing. It took Microsoft another year and two major updates, but with “Mango” I can honestly say that I think Microsoft has a solid mobile OS worthy of competing against iOS and Android.

My son recently drowned his iPhone 3GS and chose to replace it with a Motorola Atrix 4G. It is fine and he likes it. Both the Motorola hardware and the Android OS seem capable enough. The couple times I have played with it, though, I have felt like it is a cheap knock-off of the real thing–like having a Pepsi instead of Coca Cola, or eating at Burger King instead of McDonald’s. It’s OK, but I already have the “real thing” in my iPhone 4.

Windows Phone 7.5 “Mango” is a whole different story. It is a unique mobile OS that delivers a different experience that doesn’t simply try to imitate iOS–more like having a Red Bull instead of a Coca Cola, or eating at KFC instead of McDonald’s. It’s not that I like it better than iOS per se. I like it about the same but for different reasons.

When Microsoft first launched Windows Phone 7 and ran the marketing campaign about how it’s time for a phone to save us from our phones, and how Windows Phone 7 is designed to get you in, and out, and back to life, I thought they were a little silly. I mean, even with Windows Phone people will still be surfing the Web, checking email, texting people, etc.–so how exactly is that different?

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The fact of the matter is that it’s not–at least not at its core. I do still use Windows Phone to accomplish the same things, but there is actually something more to the Windows Phone ads than just marketing hype. The way Microsoft has integrated functionality into the Hubs, and seamlessly merged different features and services together makes it more streamlined and really does enable me to accomplish what I need to do and get back to life…if that is my goal.

I won’t bother recapping all of the things I like or don’t like about Windows Phone 7. You can feel free to peruse the whole 30 Days series and get those details. I will sum up by saying I was more than pleasantly surprised by “Mango”. Frankly, I was shocked at how awesome it is, and how much I really like it.

As I wrap up the 30 Days With Windows Phone 7 series, I can honestly say I found myself torn between Windows Phone and iOS, and seriously considering moving from my iPhone 4 to the HTC Titan when it becomes available from AT&T. In the end, though, I ended up sticking with iOS and pre-ordering the iPhone 4S.

It was a tough call. I use a Windows PC, and I rely on Microsoft Office, so a “Mango” smartphone would be a natural fit to some extent. But, the changes coming next week with iOS 5 and iCloud, and the seamless syncing between my iPhone, my iPad, and my Windows PC–combined with my existing investment in iOS apps–make a compelling case for iOS…at least for me.

I can’t stress enough, though, that you should take a look at Windows Phone if you’re in the market for a new smartphone. It is a very capable mobile OS and I am confident that you will not be disappointed. You owe it to yourself to at least check it out and seriously weigh the pros and cons before making a decision.

Source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/241544/windows_phone_7_day_30_wp7_mango_is_ready_for_prime_time.html

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2011 in Android, iOS, Mango, Windows Phone 7, WP7

 

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Windows 8 And Windows Phone 7 Justify At $28


Microsoft is focusing on improving its entertainment and devices business, which includes PC gaming device Xbox, the Zune portable media player, as well as its Windows mobile operating system.  These businesses together account for just under 10% of Microsoft’s stock value by our estimates.

While Windows phone 7 hasn’t generated as much revenue as expected since its launch last year, management is confident that Windows 8 will be able to provide the much needed boost to help challenge Google’s Android and Apple’s iOS. Meanwhile, Microsoft will also earn hefty income from the licensing deals signed with around 7 smartphone vendors.

While we anticipate Microsoft’s revenues from PC games, Windows Mobile and other consumer software will increase from $2.9 billion in 2012 to $3.9 billion by the end of our forecast period, Trefis members expect an increase from $3.2 billion to $4.7 billion during the same period.

We currently have a Trefis price estimate of $28 for Microsoft’s stock, about 15% above the current market price..

Windows 7 Phone Sales Slow, Management Optimistic

Windows 7 Phone saw strong sales for the initial few months after launch in October 2010 [1] but since then the sales have slowed down with market research firm AC Nielsen estimating that Windows Phone 7 accounts for just 1% of the mobile market versus 38% for Google’s Android, 27% for Apple’s iOS and 21% for RIM as of June 2011. [2]

However, Microsoft recently showed developers a preview of Windows 8 and it is quite optimistic that the new OS, with its radically different look and feel and a touch-centric user interface, will boost Windows phone 7 sales. It is also planning to launch an app store, in a nod to the success of Apple’s powerful ecosystem of products and distribution platform for apps and updates. Moreover, with Google acquiring Motorola, Microsoft remains the only pure smartphone software provider which should make it a better alternative over Android and iOS and thereby attract more smartphone vendors.

Income from Patent Licensing Deals

Microsoft has a total of 7 Android patent licensing deals with the last two coming from Acer and ViewSonic. (See Microsoft Signs with Acer and ViewSonic for License Fee from Android Sales) Under these agreements, the companies will have to pay Microsoft a fixed licensing fee for each Android device that they ship. It also has deals with manufacturers like HTC, General Dynamics, Wistron and Onkyo from whom it nets around $5-$15 for each Android device sold. In this way, it can also encourage these manufacturers in using Windows Phone 7 over Android.

Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2011/09/27/windows-8-and-windows-phone-7-justify-microsoft-at-28/

 
 

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Verizon Chief: There’s Only Room For 3 Mobile OSes


One of the tech industry’s favorite parlor games is speculating about what company will have the third-largest smartphone OS in the coming years behind Android and iOS.

Hairs tend to split between RIM’s BlackBerry, the ailing, but third-largest platform, and Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7, the minuscule new player with almost nowhere to go but up. In August, comScore reported that Windows Phone had 5.7 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, compared to 41.8 percent on Android, 27 percent on iOS, and 21.7 percent on RIM. However, RIM’s market share has been on a continuous decline for months, while Windows Phone has grown at a snail-like pace.

Cell phone operators aren’t taking sides, but clearly see only three major operating systems in the future. According to InformationWeek, Verizon Communications CEO Lowell McAdam thinks a tri-partate could form within a year.

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“The carriers are beginning to coalesce around the need for a third ecosystem,” McAdam said during a talk at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference. “Over the next 12 months I think it will coalesce and you will start to see one emerge as a legitimate third ecosystem.”

RIM’s disheartening third quarter earnings report sparked RIM obituaries and sent its stock plunging, but is the platform really doomed to go the way of Palm? Not necessarily; PCMag’s Sascha Segan offers the Canadian company Five Steps Back to BlackBerry Success.

Earlier this month Verizon, Sprint, AT&T, and U.S. Cellular released the first slew of smartphones based on BlackBerry 7 OS, the latest revision of BlackBerry’s operating system before the company migrates fully to a ground-up OS called QNX.

But RIM users also aren’t as loyal as before, especially as companies begin allowing employees to use more than just BlackBerrys at work (a concept known as Bring Your Own Device, aka BYOD). On Friday, UBS Research, via GigaOm, reported that retention for RIM devices dropped from 62 percent to 33 percent in the last 18 months.

Earlier, NPD also said Windows Phone was the platform to beat.

Furthermore RIM hasn’t announced any other major new smartphones or OS revamps for the rest of 2011; Microsoft is gearing up to launch its first major OS revamp, Windows Phone 7.5 Mango, and a slew of supported smartphones on AT&T.

Updated on Sept. 27, 4pm ET: The updated version of this story omits a part of Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam’s quote, originally reported by Information Week. McAdam did not identify which platform he believed would take third place behind Android and iOS.

For more from Sara, follow her on Twitter @sarapyin.

Source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2393475,00.asp

 
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Posted by on September 30, 2011 in Android, Blackberry, iOS, Microsoft, Windows Phone 7

 

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Skype Discloses Future Plans, First Goal Windows Phone 7 App


Internet communications giant Skype is planning to launch products tightly integrated around Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7, Xbox 360 console and enterprise products.

The company, which is on the verge of being acquired by software giant Microsoft, also plans to continue its path of integration with Facebook and release a bunch of telephony products for the platform.

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Neil Stevens, Skype’s vice president and general manager of products and marketing, said that one of the first products to come out of the Skype-Microsoft marriage will be a Skype app for the Windows Phone 7 mobile platform, according to Forbes.

Stevens claims that the company wants to create an app which feels more like a part of the platform rather than just an app and Skype will be able to do this, now that it will have unrestricted access to Windows Phone 7.

“A Windows Phone app, if done well, can show people what a really great Skype experience is like when there are no hardware or vendor limitations,” said Stevens.

The company offers apps for the iOS and Android platforms, but has to work under certain limitations imposed by Apple and Google. “We’re disadvantaged against [iOS and Android’s video-chat service] FaceTime because of this closed environment,” he claimed.

Source: http://www.itproportal.com/2011/08/11/skype-discloses-future-plans-first-goal-windows-phone-7-app/

 
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Posted by on August 17, 2011 in Android, Apple, iOS, iPhone, Windows Phone 7

 

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SMEStorage Release Cloud File Manager for Windows Phone 7


London, United Kingdom, August 04, 2011 –(PR.com)– SMEStorage, the Open Cloud Platform vendor that provides aggregated data services, has announced the release of a local and Cloud File Manager for Windows Phone 7 devices.

The Cloud File Manager Application supports over 20 Storage Clouds, including Amazon S3, Google Docs, SkyDrive, Live Mesh 2011 (read only), RackSpace Cloud Files, OpenStack, Azure Blog Storage, Office365, Alfresco, and more.

Users can add and manage Storage Clouds and files, which are then available in a virtual cloud file system on the device. Two Clouds can be added initially with more added if needed.

Once Clouds are added, the user can choose to access and view data without downloading files to the device (dependent on supported file types). Downloading files to the device from multiple clouds, for offline use, is also supported.

The App is feature rich and also supports creating and syncing of text notes voice memos to nominated storage clouds. Photos can also be uploaded and sync’d to the storage cloud of choice.

Files can be shared over email using unique links or the link is generated and added to the clipboard for use in other Apps, and files can also be made secure with password access needed before a file can be opened.

The Cloud File Manager also supports on device collaboration enabling virtual groups to be formed for content collaboration.

SMEStorage CEO Ian Osborne stated, “We have a history of supporting all major mobile platform for our Open Cloud service, and we consider Windows Phone 7 an important mobile platform both now and in the future. We are pleased to be able to provide our user base with a diverse choice of mobility options including iOS, Android and BlackBerry, and now Windows Phone 7.

“We find many organisations have a diverse mobile use and providing such diverse support is an enabler for productivity within their business.”

SMEStorage Cloud File Manager is available now on the Windows Phone Market.

Source: http://www.pr.com/press-release/343700

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2011 in Android, Blackberry, iOS, WP7

 

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Mobile Market Share: Windows Phone 7.5 Is Just the Beginning


The often maligned Steve Ballmer recently quipped that with Microsoft’s (MSFT) Windows Phone 7 gambit, Microsoft improved its mobile market share from very small to very small. Although reviewed relatively well in the press and online, the release suffered from a large number of small but vexing usability issues. Consumers balked, and Windows Phone 7 failed to make a dent in a highly competitive and increasingly fluid sector.

Data from last quarter on domestic smart phone subscriptions confirms a veritable onslaught from the Apple (AAPL) iOS and Google (GOOG) Android juggernauts:

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More recently, a Canalys worldwide survey claimed that Google’s OS now makes up about 50% of global smart phone sales thanks to broad support from a variety of vendors and wide selection of entry-level devices, boasting over 550,000 new unit activations per day. While Microsoft has done a good job leveraging its patent portfolio and legal standing to monetize its stake in Android through direct OEM agreements, there’s no question that the Redmond behemoth remains a spectator instead of a brawler in the all-out war between Apple and Google for minds, hearts and wallets.

But it’s too early to write Microsoft off, and I believe the company, already undervalued on a sum-of-components basis, sells at a further discount that ignores long-term prospects in a space which has been and will continue being volatile. One-time winners have turned into today’s losers, and those sitting on the sidelines today may yet turn out to be tomorrow’s players. With the official RTM copy of Windows Phone 7.5, codenamed “Mango,” being released into the wild, there are signs that bode well for Microsoft and its manufacturing partners:

* Microsoft’s commitment to incremental updates and functionality improvements represents a serious shift — a late one, perhaps, but critical nonetheless. When Windows Phone 7 failed to make an impact, it would’ve been easy to pull the plug on Mango and instead focus on the radically redesigned Windows 8 platform due next year, a kick-the-can strategy Microsoft has been known to use before when confronted with lackluster launches. It didn’t happen. Redmond appears to be finally taking into account that year-long release cycles do not belong in such a fluid marketplace. Smart phone users expect and demand updates in days rather than months, and Microsoft is showing signs it understands this. This is non-trivial, as the company has been out-maneuvered before by faster development cycles; witness Internet Explorer’s astonishing collapse in users as Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome offer faster updates and more rapidly expanding feature sets.

* Microsoft is investing serious resources into comprehensive support of current and future developers. Windows Phone programmers have been treated to consistent access to Mango beta builds, free toolsets and sneak previews into what writing Windows 8 applications will look like. With Windows Marketplace expanding gradually and showing signs of evolving into a truly viable ecosystem, handhelds operating Windows Phone will look more appealing to discerning consumers.

* A whole slew of support has been announced from existing major OEMs. Fujitsu, Samsung (SSNFL.PK), HTC (HTCXK.PK) and LG have all broadcast their intentions to offer Mango devices, and former leader Nokia (NOK) has already showcased a working prototype based on the appealing but Symbian-crippled N9 design. I believe Nokia’s all-in bet with Windows Phone may be a decisive point not just for the floundering Finnish giant but also for Microsoft. Nokia’s technical and design expertise is not negligible.

* Finally, the sheer quality of the Mango updates is impressive. After having an opportunity to interact with the RTM version of the OS, I walked away pleasantly surprised by the overall responsiveness on a single-core phone and lengthy list of bug fixes, enhancements and functionality tweaks. Most of the changes are subcutaneous rather than obvious, but the end effect is a “it just works” feeling that’s hard to quantify.The pane interface is streamlined and intuitive, a welcome departure from iOS and Android implementations of the touch interface. Engadget’s popular preview sums it all up rather well:

Wonder of wonders, miracle of miracles, Windows Phone is developing into the OS we’ve been asking for since we first used it last year. By adding in crucial elements like multitasking, groups, social network integration and more, it’s starting to play catch-up to the other big names in mobile. Not overcome — catch-up. Mango hasn’t shown us anything truly groundbreaking yet. At least this platform, still in its youth, is stepping onto the same playing field as hard hitters like iOS and Android, though. One thing that surprised us was how few bugs or choppy effects were present in this build, an impressive feat considering we’re still a few months away from completion. Overall, we’ve come away with a positive outlook on Windows Phone’s newest iteration, and are very eager to see the finished result

These factors point to this quarter as the first of many during which Microsoft seriously establishes itself as a contender in the smart phone space.

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MSFT doesn’t look as cheap as it did three months ago, after outperforming the Nasdaq by a full 11%, but it’s still historically undervalued. As the market continues to be rattled by cyclical worries, this appears to be good opportunity to establish or expand exposure.

Source: http://seekingalpha.com/article/284173-mobile-market-share-windows-phone-7-5-is-just-the-beginning

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2011 in Android, Google, iOS, Nokia, WP7

 

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